Crisis Care Now: Delaware Leads with Recovery Response Center Grand Opening

What People Think vs What We DoOn Tuesday, August 2, 2016, Delaware Governor Jack Markell and several other state and county representatives plan to attend the grand opening of the new crisis stabilization center funded by the Delaware Department of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH).  The new Recovery Response Center (RRC) is the latest accomplishment in his state’s effort to build more robust mental health services.

“This new facility demonstrates the commitment we have made in Delaware to create a robust community-based mental health system,” Markell said. “Individuals experiencing a mental health or addiction crisis need immediate and appropriate evaluation and care. The Recovery Response Center in Newark provides that important first step in getting people in crisis the care they deserve.”

DSAMH Director Michael Barbieri said the crisis staff is broad-based and specifically trained. “Delaware residents in crisis will be met by trained clinicians and peers with lived experience. Under the medical leadership of onsite psychiatric providers, these staff will work quickly to help people rest and de-escalate and take the first steps towards recovery.”

The Newark location just outside Wilmington is RI International’s second crisis center to be opened in the state of Delaware, with a similar program in Ellendale since 2012. By the end of 2016, the Company will operate ten Recovery Response Centers across five states, all modeled after the Peoria, Arizona RRC, established in 1996.

Newark, Delaware Recovery Response Center (2016)

Newark, Delaware Recovery Response Center (2016)

Peoria, AZ Recovery Response Center

Peoria, Arizona Recovery Response Center (1996) funded by Aetna-affiliated Mercy Maricopa Integrated Care

In the Crisis Now: Transforming Services is Within Our Reach report, Crisis Stabilization Program facilities are described as a core component of a full service continuum. “Crisis residential facilities are usually small (e.g., 6 to 16 beds), and often more home-like than institutional. They are staffed with a mix of professionals and paraprofessionals. They may operate as part of a community mental health center or in affiliation with a hospital.”

When these crisis programs employ the Peoria RRC “Living Room” model, the focus is on a welcoming and healing environment, and certified peers operate as integral members of the team emphasizing hope and empowerment. “Individuals in crisis are admitted as ‘guests’ into a pleasant, home-like environment designed to promote a sense of safety and privacy.” [Click below for a detailed look.]

Timeline of RRC

Timeline of RRC “Living Room” Model Adoption

Last week, I toured the Company’s west coast crisis facilities. The Fife, Washington State RRC, was launched in 2009 by now Optum Health Pierce County Regional Service Network CEO Bea Dixon and manager Jodie Leer (who now serves as the program’s Regional Service Administrator). Following the 2015 supreme court ruling on “psychiatric boarding,” RI International launched a 16 bed Evaluation and Treatment program (E&T), which like the Fife RRC, got its start in a wing of Western State Hospital.

Washington State RRC

Fife, Washington State Recovery Response Center (2009)

From Washington State, I traveled to Southern California to visit the two new 24 hour crisis programs funded by the Riverside County Mental Health Board. While housed in a temporary structure awaiting the completion of construction on a brand new facility, the Riverside RRC team led by LCSW Peggy Wiley has already served more than 800 people. The Palm Springs location will open later this year.

RRC Riverside CA

Riverside, California Crisis Service Center (2016)

Last month, Leon Boyko, RI International’s Chief Administrative Officer, and I visited the Durham Recovery Response Center funded by Alliance Behavioral Healthcare. Site administrator Joy Brunson-Nsubuga, LMFT, LCAS, shared with us the Durham outcomes dashboard and the high safety survey score that reflects staff perception of the program.

This intersection of both a recovery and safety environment is critical as Recovery Response Center teams support individuals in highest need. Best practice medical, clinical and recovery interventions and supports are immediately engaged.

Why so important?

All of the RI International Recovery Response Center facilities receive direct drop-off by trained law enforcement teams, with a handoff and turn-around time that generally runs 10 minutes or less. This critical practice can avoid both criminalization of crisis-induced behavior and the costs and potential trauma associated with hospitalization. If it is determined a guest continues to pose a safety threat to self or others, he or she may be transferred to a more intensive level of care.

Durham NC RRC

Durham, North Carolina Recovery Response Center (2015)

The conclusion of the Crisis Now: Transforming Services is Within Our Reach report on Crisis Stabilization Programs: “Many communities have only two basic options available to those in crisis, and they represent the lowest and highest end of the continuum. But for those individuals whose crisis represents the middle of the ladder, outpatient services are not intensive enough to meet their needs, and acute care inpatient services are unnecessary. Crisis stabilization facilities offer an alternative that is less costly, less intrusive, and more easily designed to feel like home.”

The US Healthcare system spends billions on acute care psychiatric inpatient hospitalization and lengthy stays in hospital emergency departments where persons with mental health and addiction issues languish.

But, the solutions are right in front of us. And, more and more states, like Delaware, are saying “Crisis Care Now!”

DE RRC Grand Opening DE RRC Grand Opening DE RRC Grand Opening DE RRC Grand Opening DE RRC Grand Opening DE RRC Grand Opening

 

MENU